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Removal of synthetic dyes from wastewaters: a review – ScienceDirect

Removal of synthetic dyes from wastewaters: a review - ScienceDirect

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The more recent methods for the removal of synthetic dyes from waters and wastewater are complied. The various methods of removal such as adsorption on various sorbents, chemical decomposition by oxidation, photodegradation, and microbiological decoloration, employing activated sludge, pure cultures and microbe consortiums are described. The advantages and disadvantages of the various methods are discussed and their efficacies are compared.

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Copyright © 2021 Elsevier B.V. or its licensors or contributors. ScienceDirect ® is a registered trademark of Elsevier B.V.

ScienceDirect ® is a registered trademark of Elsevier B.V.

Campaign launched to make 30 km/h streets the norm for cities worldwide

Streets for Life: Why #Love30? Low speed streets save lives and are the heart of any community. 30 km/h (20 mph) speed limits where people and traffic mix make for streets that are safe, healthy, green and liveable, in other words, streets for life. The 6th UN Global Road Safety Week is calling on policymakers to act for low speed streets worldwide, limiting speeds to 30 km/h where people walk, live and play. Join the #Love30 campaign to call for 30 km/h speed limits to be the norm for cities, towns and villages worldwide.What are the benefits of 30 km/h streets? 30 km/h streets are safe and healthy.30 km/h streets protect all who use them, but especially the most vulnerable, like pedestrians, cyclists, children and older people and people with disabilities. 30 km/h streets where people and traffic mix help prevent road traffic deaths and promote physical activity, because when streets are safe, people walk and cycle more.     30 km/h streets are green.30 km/h streets are vital in efforts to shift to zero-carbon mobility. Streets that promote safe walking and cycling can reduce car dependency and harmful vehicle emissions that contribute to climate change. To protect the environment, people need safe, low-speed streets that encourage sustainable transport choices.30 km/h streets are liveable. Liveable streets, made possible by low speeds, are at the heart of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and can facilitate many of its targets. As we build back better from the COVID-19 pandemic, everyone should benefit from low speed streets, so that they not only survive, but also hrive. 30 km/h streets where people and traffic mix are streets for life. Join the 6th UN Global Road Safety Week to help garner policy commitments at national and local levels to deliver 30 km/h speed limits in urban areas; generate local support for these speed measures in order to create safe, healthy, green and liveable cities; and build momentum towards the launch of the Global Plan for the Decade of Action for Road Safety 2021-2030 and the High-Level Meeting of the UN General Assembly in 2022. 

Campaign launched to make 30 km/h streets the norm for cities worldwide

Streets for Life: Why #Love30?

Low speed streets save lives and are the heart of any community. 30 km/h (20 mph) speed limits where people and traffic mix make for streets that are safe, healthy, green and liveable, in other words, streets for life. The 6th UN Global Road Safety Week is calling on policymakers to act for low speed streets worldwide, limiting speeds to 30 km/h where people walk, live and play. Join the #Love30 campaign to call for 30 km/h speed limits to be the norm for cities, towns and villages worldwide.

What are the benefits of 30 km/h streets?

30 km/h streets are safe and healthy.

30 km/h streets protect all who use them, but especially the most vulnerable, like pedestrians, cyclists, children and older people and people with disabilities. 30 km/h streets where people and traffic mix help prevent road traffic deaths and promote physical activity, because when streets are safe, people walk and cycle more.    

30 km/h streets are green.

30 km/h streets are vital in efforts to shift to zero-carbon mobility. Streets that promote safe walking and cycling can reduce car dependency and harmful vehicle emissions that contribute to climate change. To protect the environment, people need safe, low-speed streets that encourage sustainable transport choices.

30 km/h streets are liveable.

Liveable streets, made possible by low speeds, are at the heart of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and can facilitate many of its targets. As we build back better from the COVID-19 pandemic, everyone should benefit from low speed streets, so that they not only survive, but also hrive. 30 km/h streets where people and traffic mix are streets for life.

Join the 6th UN Global Road Safety Week to help garner policy commitments at national and local levels to deliver 30 km/h speed limits in urban areas; generate local support for these speed measures in order to create safe, healthy, green and liveable cities; and build momentum towards the launch of the Global Plan for the Decade of Action for Road Safety 2021-2030 and the High-Level Meeting of the UN General Assembly in 2022. 

EE 30 Under 30

This network of leaders by addressing social and environmental issues ranging from mobilizing students for climate action to mitigating tensions between humans and wildlife.

EE 30 Under 30

Age: 28Bamenda, Cameroon

Executive DirectorCrusaders for Environmental Protection and Ozone WatchRead bio

Age: 22Ibadan, Nigeria

Managing DirectorClean City InitiativeRead bio

Age: 29Ifo, Nigeria

DirectorBookers International SchoolsRead bio

Age: 24Pandan, Philippines

Project Liaison OfficerAlpha Team Organization | ClimatEducate ProjectRead bio

Age: 28Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

Environmental Education SupervisorUS Fish and Wildlife Service, John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at TinicumRead bio

Age: 27Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

Founder & DirectorKilometro UnoRead bio

Age: 30Baltimore, Maryland, United States

Manager of Education Programs The National AquariumRead bio

Age: 28London, United Kingdom

Founder & DirectorThe Kindness School FoundationRead bio

Age: 29Guwahati, India

General SecretaryPHANTOMRead bio

Age: 27Rabat, Malta

Head of Education and EngagementBirdLife MaltaRead bio

Age: 29Marikina City, Philippines

National Lead for No Plastics in Nature initiativeWorld Wide Fund for Nature – PhilippinesRead bio

Age: 30United Kingdom

Marine Consultant and AdvocateIndependentRead bio

Age: 30Berlin, Germany

EcologistTU BerlinRead bio

Age: 24East Coast Demerara, Guyana

Volunteer and ResearcherEco ClubRead bio

Age: 18Bangor, Maine, United States

FellowMaine Environmental Education AssociationRead bio

Age: 17Mumbai, India

FounderThe Right GreenRead bio

Age: 29Arlington, Virginia, United States

Manager, Education Products Project Learning TreeRead bio

Age: 30 Yilan, Taiwan

Founder and Chief Executive OfficerShinnan Tiandong RiceRead bio

Age: 28Melbourne, Australia

Program Director, Global SchoolsUN Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN)Read bio

Age: 13Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

StudentGEMS United Indian SchoolRead bio

Age: 30Nairobi, Kenya

Founder and DirectorTonyWildRead bio

Age: 26Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Assistant Professor of Sport Management | FounderSUNY Cortland | The Sport Ecology GroupRead bio

Age: 30Mumbai, India

FounderUpcycler’s LabRead bio

Age: 25Naranjito, Puerto Rico, United States

M.S. Natural Resources Graduate StudentCornell UniversityRead bio

Age: 27Buffalo, New York, United States

Aquatic Ecology TeacherBuffalo Public SchoolsRead bio

Age: 21Cimahi, Indonesia

Co-FounderBaramoedaRead bio

Age: 25San Antonio, Texas, United States

Founder/DirectorCharles Roundtree Bloom ProjectRead bio

Age: 26Bomet, Kenya

Executive DirectorGreen Towns InitiativeRead bio

Age: 26Santiago, Chile

PresidentCEUS Chile NGORead bio

Age: 29Hickory, North Carolina, United States

Masters StudentUniversity of new HavenRead bio

Anoka Primrose Abeyrathne – Read bio

Sara Alamo – Read bio

Nicole Andreou – Read bio

Jasveen Brar – Read bio

Beatriz Cañas – Read bio

Dyson Chee – Read bio

Raquel Condori – Read bio

Kim Alvin C. De Lara – Read bio

Erinn Drage – Read bio

Emmanuel Ken Ekwerem – Read bio

Pangaea Finn – Read bio

Lyndsey Franklin – Read bio

Niria Alicia Garcia – Read bio

Alex Goetz – Read bio

Corrie Grosse – Read bio

Mariam Kabamba Merry – Read bio

Veronica Lin – Read bio

Rumbidzai Pamela Magwiro – Read bio

Ajay Mittal – Read bio

Charles Mugarura – Read bio

Alerick Pacay – Read bio

Ananda Winny Mezha Puteri – Read bio

Stephanie Quon – Read bio

Sean Russell – Read bio

Anna Tari – Read bio

Vermon D. Timbas – Read bio

Kimi Waite – Read bio

Quek Yew Aun – Read bio

Adam Young – Read bio

Eduarda Zoghbi – Read bio

Adedoyin Adeleke – Read bio

Kehkashan Basu – Read bio

Tiffany Carey – Read bio

Gina Fiorile – Read bio

Nakasi Fortune – Read bio

Jared Hiakita – Read bio

Wing Man Samantha Kong – Read bio

Vinh Le – Read bio

Denise Lee – Read bio

Michele Madison – Read bio

Benjamin May – Read bio

Lucas Metropulos – Read bio

Taiji Nelson – Read bio

Brandon Nguyen – Read bio

Chris Nixon – Read bio

Amira Odeh – Read bio

Anna Oposa – Read bio

Pratikshya Paneru – Read bio

Jason Pang – Read bio

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Fadwa Bouhedda – Read bio

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Marquese Fluellen – Read bio

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Martin Huber – Read bio

Karlee Jewell – Read bio

Carlos Lerma – Read bio

Xoni Ma – Read bio

Hannah MacDonald – Read bio

Elham Nasr Azadani – Read bio

Adam Ratner – Read bio

Roland Richardson – Read bio

Quinn Runkle – Read bio

Kayla Soren – Read bio

Leandra Taylor – Read bio

Cade Terada – Read bio

Luisa S Zarate – Read bio

Robert Adragna – Read bio

Miranda Andersen – Read bio

Sophie Bernstein – Read bio

Garrett Blad – Read bio

Ta’Kaiya Blaney – Read bio

David Chang – Read bio

Vincent Culliver – Read bio

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Paola Flores – Read bio

Eden Full – Read bio

MaryAm Ghadiri Khanaposhtani – Read bio

Lauren Gibson – Read bio

Lauren Gibson – Read bio

David Gonzalez – Read bio

CJ Goulding – Read bio

Ana Humphrey – Read bio

Dieuwertje Kast – Read bio

S L – Read bio

Kelsey Leonard – Read bio

Yue Li – Read bio

Chloe Maxmin – Read bio

Charles Orgbon – Read bio

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Madi Vorva – Read bio

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